Monday Miners: DONRIGSAY

Each Monday, give yourself one solid minute to try to come up with the longest word you can find by rearranging the letters below, and see if you can best the panel from the British comedy words-and-numbers show, 8 out of 10 Cats Does Countdown. Once you’ve settled on a word, click and highlight the area below Answers to reveal what words the panel found, and see whose was longest =)

This letters-game comes from Series 1, Episode 2:

DONRIGSAY

Answers:

saying, adoring, dragons

Did you do better?

Posted in Monday Miners | Leave a comment

Sonnet Sunday DS-003: Blessed Be Forescheduling

For rules and discussion of sonnet formats, pop over to this introduction.

This week’s sonnet is a bit clunky, I must admit. When I wrote it I was a bit flustered with myself for writing it with a different rhyming scheme (AA, BB..) and then having to rework it -_-

The thing I like the most about today’s
new web design formats are all of those,

which let me make a post and set it days,
ahead so I can write out all the prose,

and not have to wake up and make a post,
the morning of the date it needs to go.

Since I seem to prefer to write the most
in bigger bursts instead of writing slow,

I’m blessed with the ability to make,
an automated post and take a break.

I made two flubbed versions of this sonnet.. one during the first writing, I realized I used the wrong rhyming scheme, and then in my correction, I used yet another wrong rhyming scheme. There are actually 3 versions of this same sonnet with somewhat different wording, but I’m pleased this one worked out the best overall.

Posted in Sonnet Sunday | Leave a comment

Monday Miners: UGSEAMBPO

Each Monday, give yourself one solid minute to try to come up with the longest word you can find by rearranging the letters below, and see if you can best the panel from the British comedy words-and-numbers show, 8 out of 10 Cats Does Countdown. Once you’ve settled on a word, click and highlight the area below Answers to reveal what words the panel found, and see whose was longest =)

This letters-game comes from Series 5, Episode 8:

UGSEAMBPO

Answers:

pages, games, omegas

Did you do better?

Posted in Monday Miners | Leave a comment

Masterlist of British vs US Words: Boot vs Trunk, Chips vs Fries, etc.

Just a quick but extensive list of words that are different in the UK-at-large from American English, but are generally the same thing.

US: Chips (Doritos, etc)
Brit: Crisps

US: french fries, potato wedges
Brit: chips

US: Cookies (Oreos, etc)
Brit: Biscuits

US: restroom, toilet
Brit: Loo, WC, bog

US: toilet paper, TP
Brit: bog roll, loo paper

US: trunk (storage area of a car)
Brit: boot

US: going on vacation
Brit: going on holiday

US: apartments
Brit: flats

US: counterclockwise
Brit: anticlockwise

US: sneakers, tennis shoes
Brit: trainers

US: sweater, hoodie
Brit: jumper, hooded jumper

US: truck
Brit: lorry

US: bullhorn
Brit: loudhailer

US: 18-wheeler, semi
Brit: articulated lorry

US: coveralls
Brit: boiler suit

US: hood of a car
Brit: bonnet of a car

US: vest
Brit: waistcoat

US: tow truck
Brit: breakdown van

US: plastic wrap
Brit: cling film

US: crib (for a baby)
Brit: cot

US: public housing, ‘the projects’
Brit: council estate

US: alligator clip
Brit: crocodile clip

US: defroster (in a car)
Brit: demister

US: robe, bathrobe
Brit: dressing gown

US: pacifier, binky (for a baby)
Brit: dummy

US: trash, garbage
Brit: rubbish

US: ground (electrical)
Brit: earth

US: fire department
Brit: fire brigade

US: fish stick
Brit: fish fingers

US: switchblade
Brit: flick knife

US: yard, lawn (front yard, back yard, etc)
Brit: garden (front garden, back garden, etc)

US: period (punctuation.)
Brit: full stop

US: gear shift
Brit: gear lever

US: bachelor party
Brit: stag do, stag night

US: going to the hospital, in the hospital
Brit: going to hospital, in hospital

US: jelly beans
Brit: jelly babies

US: John Q Public
Brit: Joe Public

US: rummage sale, garage sale
Brit: jumble sale

US: crossing guard
Brit: lollipop (-man/lady)

US: suspenders
Brit: bracers

US: hungry
Brit: peckish

US: zucchini
Brit: courgette

US: math
Brit: maths

US: odometer (car gauge measuring distance)
Brit: milometer (‘mile-ometer’)

US: cell phone
Brit: mobile

US: newscaster, anchor
Brit: newsreader

US: tic-tac-toe
Brit: noughts and crosses

US: license plate
Brit: number plate, registration plate

US: baked potato
Brit: jacket potato

US: eggplant
Brit: aubergine

US: turtleneck
Brit: polo-neck

US: absentee ballot
Brit: postal vote

US: utility pole, telephone pole
Brit: pylon

US: jump rope
Brit: skipping rope

US: take-out, to-go order, fast food
Brit: takeaway

US: check mark the box
Brit: tick the box

US: ‘knock on wood’
Brit: ‘touch wood’

US: truck stop
Brit: transport cafe

US: subway
Brit: underground, tube

US: closet, armoire
Brit: wardrobe

US: the letter Z (‘zee’)
Brit: the letter Zed

US: fender (of a car)
Brit: wing

US: certified mail
Brit: recorded delivery

US: to get in line (to wait one’s turn for something)
Brit: to queue up

US: doing pushups
Brit: doing pressups

US: oven mitt
Brit: oven glove

US: diaper
Brit: nappy

US: popsicle/otter-pops (both brand names)
Brit: ice lollies

US: bangs (hair that hangs down in front)
Brit: fringe

US: divided highway
Brit: dual carriageway

US: fanny pack
Brit: bumbag

US: cotton candy
Brit: candy floss

US: parking lot
Brit: car park

US: soccer
Brit: football

US: gelatin, Jell-O
Brit: jelly

US: jelly (sandwich spread)
Brit: jam

US: motorcycle
Brit: motorbike, motorscooter

US: Hoveround (brand), motorized chair
Brit: mobility scooter

US: sidewalk
Brit: pavement, footpath

US: gasoline (fuel for vehicles)
Brit: petrol

US: in the mail
Brit: in the post

US: eraser (such as for pencils)
Brit: rubber

US: schedule
Brit: timetable

US: multiplication tables
Brit: times-tables

US: flashlight
Brit: torch

US: windshield
Brit: windscreen

US: advice columnist
Brit: agony aunt

US: German Shepherd (dog)
Brit: Alsatian

US: parka-style jacket
Brit: anorak

US: lawyer, attorney
Brit: barrister, solicitor

US: ink pen, ball-point pen
Brit: biro

US: parenthesis
Brit: round brackets

US: downtown
Brit: city centre

US: stove
Brit: cooker

US: resume (job application document)
Brit: CV

US: tuxedo, sport coat, suit coat
Brit: dinner jacket

US: drunk driving
Brit: drink driving

US: school principal
Brit: headmaster

US: vacuum cleaner
Brit: hoover

US: quotation marks
Brit: inverted commas

US: ladybug
Brit: ladybird

US: go check at lost and found
Brit: go check at lost property

US: underwear, undies
Brit: pants

US: baby carriage, stroller
Brit: pram, push chair

US: backpack
Brit: rucksack

US: wrench
Brit: spanner

US: streetcar, trolley
Brit: tram

US: crosswalk
Brit: zebra crossing

US: wouldn’t touch with a ten-foot pole
Brit: wouldn’t touch with a bargepole

US: dame, broad, gal
Brit: bird

US: bus
Brit: coach

US: male friends, buddies, bros, the guys,
Brit: chaps, mates, lads

US: skeletons in the closet
Brit: skeletons in the cupboard

US: fart
Brit: trump

US: umbrella
Brit: brolly

US: calling someone collect
Brit: making a reverse-charge call

US: ground beef
Brit: mince

US: dead tired, exhausted, beat
Brit: knackered

US: student discount, elderly discount
Brit: student concession, elderly consession

US: on a fixed income
Brit: pensioner

US: pharmacist / pharmacy
Brit: chemist / chemist shop

US: down in the dumps, depressed
Brit: gutted

US: epic fail, jack up, mess up royally
Brit: cock up

US: barf, hurl, throw up, vomit, toss one’s cookies, retch
Brit: chunder

US: shady, creepy
Brit: dodgy

US: delish, yummy
Brit: scrummy

US: one’s own body
Brit: one’s rig

US: awesome
Brit: brilliant

..and more to be added as I come across them =)

Credits: my own experience listening to BBC Radio, Oxford Dictionaries, Bored Panda, GrammarCheck, Englisch-hilfen, Wikipedia, JustEnglish.me, How Stuff Works, Anglotopia,

Posted in Uncategorized | Leave a comment

“Weekly Double Crosser” Puzzle Concept

This is a crossword puzzle concept I came up with sometime around 2003, but never really tried aggressively publishing any, until now. I’m putting it out there to see whether anyone might like this concept to become a legit weekly puzzle here, and to gauge whether they think it might be too difficult or too easy, or just right.

The rules are simple: Either draw two of this shape —

..or print out a copy of this design (pdf, two figures on one page), and fill out the blanks as you normally would any standard crossword puzzle — except with the twist, that there are two clues for each down number and across number, because on which puzzle they belong is not specified.

The first 1-down could go on the left side, and the other 1-down naturally on the right, but first 2-down could go on the right; you never know which one it goes on until you get others to fit.

Clues:

~~~ ACROSS ~~~
~~~ DOWN ~~~
1. Not night 1. Not basey
1. Garfunkel 1. Struggles to keep
   
4. vehicle 2. Between ! and #
4. OJ judge 2. Sun deity
   
5. netflix offerings 3. foutain of
5. gooey slick 3. draw on thin overlay
   
7. Top Scout rank 5. Sun’s name
7. Cyrus’ breaky subject 5. lyr.”Sending out an”
   
10. call __ duty 6. Diamond Phillips
10. lyr.”it’s magic” 6. Common sweetener init.
   
11. popular -dictionary,init. 8. online chortle
11. surgery area 8. decay
   
12. bobsledder cousin 9. Before
12. dagger-eye feels 9. Boston __ Party
   
14. coffee drink 13. US civil war victor
14. coney snack 13. competed for speed
   
15. aural orifice 14. Hagman
15. black goop 14. unshaven jaw
   
17. farm allergen 16. Australia domain ext
17. doesn’t work 16. liquor quitter meetup
Posted in Uncategorized, Wednesday Double Crosser | Leave a comment

Tom Swifty Tuesday: Feb 2018 Week 2

My hemorrhoids can run circles around yours, and that’s just the way I like it,” Tom prolapsed.

Come up with a better Tom Swifty joke than this, and your tweet will get featured on this post and added to the Masterlist of Tom Swifty Jokes with credit for submitting it.. It’s Tom Swifty Tuesday!
Continue reading

Posted in Tom Swifty Tuesday | Leave a comment

Masterlist of Tom Swifty Jokes

“Loads of Tom Swifty jokes are listed here,” Tom enumerated. Not all of them are great. Credit given if known, but due to the short nature of the joke and how simplistic the gag/pun is, more than one person will undoubtedly have come up with the same joke on their own, independently.

Brief Intro to Tom Swifty (or Tom Swiftie) Jokes

For those unfamiliar, a Tom Swifty joke is typical one sentence, involving a quote, followed by credit to Tom for saying it, and a way that he said it that is typically a dry pun or twist on the remark that was said.

For example:
Continue reading

Posted in Tom Swifty Tuesday | 1 Comment

Can Facts Be False? YES. Here’s Why.

I assert that facts are objectively-provable statements, regardless of whether they are objectively true or objectively false.

Continue reading

Posted in Uncategorized | Leave a comment

Monday Miners: OIESHMRAT

Each Monday, give yourself one solid minute to try to come up with the longest word you can find by rearranging the letters below, and see if you can best the panel from the British comedy words-and-numbers show, 8 out of 10 Cats Does Countdown. Once you’ve settled on a word, click and highlight the area below Answers to reveal what words the panel found, and see whose was longest =)

This letters-game comes from Series 1, Episode 2:

OIESHMRAT

Answers:

mohair, master, hamster, atomiser, moister, aerosmith

Did you do better?

Posted in Monday Miners | Leave a comment

Sonnet Sunday for 2018-0210 / DS-002: Oh Brother, How Type Thou

For rules and discussion of sonnet formats, pop over to this introduction.

This week’s sonnet is autobiographical, about a decision to buy a typewriter with gift money when I was a teenager, juuuust before computers really became mainstream.

A ways back when, my grams gave me a Ben,
and next a long discussion then we mused:

How should I spend this sum I’ve been given?
What won: a typerwriter is how it’d best be used.

I liked to write, to type, and Uni foists
A solid rule that papers must be turned

In with a certain unhandwritten choice
Of legiblity for which profs yearned.

But turned out that computers won that race.
It now, alone, sits near, but far outpaced.

Many years ago, when I was still a teenager and never really bought anything ‘big’ with my own money, I was given a $100 bill (called a ‘Ben’ above, as the person shown on the USD$100 is Benjamin Franklin) by my father’s mother.

After some discussion, my mother and I decided together that it would be used to buy me a typewriter, which I would need for college one day. In my father’s era of college, papers could still be handed in in cursive, and in elementary school teachers told us all of our college papers would need to be written in cursive as rationale for us to learn it. My mother proposed that college papers would probably all need to be typed given how less and less expensive typewriters were becoming, and she ended up being right, in a way.

I used it to type several things, including, memorably, a Top Gun fan-fic starring my schoolmates and a favorite teacher as the leader. It was a Brother AX-450, which had a neat feature where you could type out a whole line of text on a little one-line LCD screen that had a character limit, and you could edit that single line before you entered it to be typed, and the machine would type that single line for you and carriage return.

Shortly thereafter, however, the family got a hand-me-down 8088 IBM-compatible desktop PC, upon which I could type stories on word-processing software called Symphony, which even had password protection so no one could “steal my ideas” and I kept most of my stories on a 5-1/4″ floppy.. but, alas, the Brother typewriter rarely even ever got used after that. I still have it, too, and am not sure when I’ll ever part with it.

Posted in Uncategorized | Leave a comment